Home - Checklist of the Plants from the Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge

Pontederiaceae

Heteranthera limosa; Blue Mud-Plantain; Native; Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Heteranthera rotundifolia; Round-leaf Mud-Plantain; Native; Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Heteranthera multiflora; Many-flowered Mud-Plantain; Native; Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Zosterella dubia; Synonyms: Heteranthera dubia; Water Star Grass, Grassleaf Mud Plantain; Native; Herbarium specimen by J. R. Helm 1982, in Crab Orchard NWR accession no. 90305. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Potamogetonaceae

Potamogeton crispus; Curly Pondweed; Introduced (Europe); Rare. Established in Grassy Bay at the end of Broken Handle Road off Spillway Road. Potentially a very bad invasive weed.  Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Potamogeton diversifolius; Waterthread Pondweed; Native; Uncommon. Can be found around the boat ramp at Little Grassy Lake, near the dam. Ulaszek (1988) also found it in shallow waters of Devil's Kitchen Lake. The floating leaves of this aquatic are small and oval in outline. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Potamogeton foliosus; Leafy Pondweed; Native; Ulaszek (1988) lists this plant as uncommon in shallow waters of Devil's Kitchen Lake. Yatskievych (1999) reports that in Missouri this species is more frequent in spring branches and streams than in ponds and lakes. I have not seen it in the Refuge. The plant lacks floating leaves. The submerged leaves are linear. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Potamogeton nodosus; American (Longleaf) Pondweed; Native; Common in shallow water of all lakes, creeks and ponds throughout the Refuge. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Smilacaceae

Smilax bona-nox; Saw Greenbrier; Native; Ulaszek (1988) reports this taxon as uncommon in a successional field. Mohlenbrock (2014) and Jones (2005) consider it common. I have not yet encountered it in the Refuge. Apparently southern Illinois is at the northern edge of its range. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Smilax ecirrhata; Carrion Flower; Native; Herbarium specimen by J. R. Helm 1982, along the shoreline of Devil's Kitchen Lake, accession no. 112155. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Smilax glauca; Glaucous Catbrier; Native; Common in woods, thickets, fields, and moist disturbed areas. Easily recognized by the glaucous, whitish underside of its leaves.  Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Smilax hispida; Synonyms: Smilax tamnoides; Bristly Greenbrier; Native; Occasional in woods, thickets, and edges of woods. It is frequent in Kentucky and the most common Greenbrier in Missouri. The prickles are slender, bristle-like. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Smilax lasioneuron; Carrion Flower; Native; Herbarium specimen by J. W. Voigt 1978, Crab Orchard Lake Cambria Neck, accession no. 112162. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Smilax pulverulenta; Carrion Flower; Native; Rare. Can be found  in the woods along a trail in the Grassy Creek national wilderness. This is a herbaceous plant without prickles. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Smilax rotundifolia; Roundleaf Greenbrier; Native; Locally common in thickets and edge of woods. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants


Sparganiaceae (or Typhaceae)

Sparganium americanum; American Bur-Reed; Native; Rare. Occurred along the shore of peninsula at north end of Devil's Kitchen Lake. According to Mohlenbrock (2014), this species is restricted to the northern 1/4 of the state. On the other hand, Yatskievych (1999), restricts the species to mostly south of the Missouri River. Jones (2005) says that its distribution is unclear. Sparganium americanum is listed as endangered on the 2011 Illinois Endangered Species Protection Board Checklist. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Sparganium eurycarpum; Broad-seeded Bur-Reed; Native; According to Mohlenbrock (2014), occasional throughout the state, but less common in the southern counties. The plant is endangered in Kentucky. It occurs in the A-41 wetlands. Native. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Trilliaceae (or Melanthiaceae)

Trillium flexipes; White Trillium; Native; Locally common in wooded areas. Among the favorite spring wildflowers along Rocky Bluff Trail. It is difficult to resist taking yet another photograph every time we see it. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Trillium recurvatum; Red Trillium, Purple Wake Robin; Native; Locally common in woods. Readily observed along Rocky Bluff Trail. Another fine spring flower. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Trillium sessile; Sessile Trillium; Native; Herbarium specimen by M. Basinger & J. Shimp 1992, no location is given (in the Refuge?), accession no. 124556. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Typhaceae

Typha angustifolia; Narrow-leaved Cat-tail; Native; Locally common along the shore of Devil's Kitchen Lake. Probably native, although the plant also occurs in Europe and Asia. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Typha latifolia; Common Cat-tail; Native; Locally common along shores of all lakes and in wet places. It is the more common of the two Cat-tails. This species is readily identified by its single spike: the staminate and pistillate segments are not separated, as they are in T. angustifolia. Probably native, although the plant also occurs in Europe and Asia. Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants

Uvulariaceae (or Colchicaceae)

Uvularia grandiflora; Large-flowered (Yellow) Bellwort; Native; Ulaszek (1988) and CCP list this attractive species as occasional in dry upland forest. Chris Benda found it in the Prison RNA. Chris Evans discovered it along Rocky Bluff Trail Photos Phytoimages; USDA Plants